Last Man Standing: Nuclear Plants Power Texans During Deluge – Wind Turbines Automatically Shut Down During Hurricane Harvey

WEALTH, Capitalism and Technology save lives. Green energy, Socialism and Poverty kill…

STOP THESE THINGS

Texans have been in the news for all the wrong reasons, over the last week or so.

Hurricane Harvey belted the Texan coast with 130 mph (209 kph) winds and delivered a deluge of biblical proportions.

For some time now, Texas has been the pinup girl for American wind worshippers. With some 21,000 MW of nominal capacity spread over 40 projects, like everything in Texas, wind power is ‘big’.

Except, of course, when the weather turns nasty.

Modern industrial wind turbines do not operate when wind speeds hit around 25 m/s (90kph or 55mph) – Hurricane Harvey dished up a gale double that speed, and more.

In order to prevent their catastrophic disintegration (as seen in the video below) Texas’s turbines downed tools, en masse, (as they are deliberately designed to do) leaving the critical work of providing power to storm battered Texans to its fleet of nuclear power plants.

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The Cost Of Going Green: Taxpayers Hit With A $60Bn Power Bill

Screen Shot 2017-09-01 at , September 1, 6.14.05 PM

The cost of a renewable energy push has been revealed | The Australian

“We get a tax credit if we build a lot of wind farms. That’s the only reason to build them. They don’t make sense without the tax credit.” – Warren Buffett

“Suggesting that renewables will let us phase rapidly off fossil fuels in the United States, China, India, or the world as a whole is almost the equivalent of believing in the Easter Bunny and Tooth Fairy.” – James Hansen (The Godfather of global warming alarmism and former NASA climate chief)

Renewable energy technologies simply won’t work; we need a fundamentally different approach.” – Top Google engineers

***

UPDATE on the cost to the taxpayer of politicians crazed obsession with global warming theory and the green faith, leading to the mad push for renewable unreliable energy.

Via The Australian :

Taxpayers will have paid more than $60 billion through federal renewable energy subsidies by 2030, about twice what the crumbling car industry received over 15 years and enough to build about 10 large nuclear reactors.

The government’s large and small-scale renewable energy ­targets, which will compel energy retailers to buy 33 terawatt hours of wind, solar and hydro energy by 2030, will deliver about $45bn of subsidies to renewable energy producers over 20 years, according to analysis by The Australian.

The grab bag of direct subsidies from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency and the Clean Energy Finance Corporation — which have spent or lent concessionally, respectively, $870 million in grants since 2010, and $4.3bn since 2013 — are on top of that.

Meanwhile, the proposed clean energy target arising from the government’s Finkel review, would mandate a further 33TWh of ­energy from renewable sources, costing an extra $11.3bn over the 10 years to 2030.

Government MPs yesterday sounded the alarm over the subsidies and called for clarity over government plans for a new coal-fired power station.

The chairman of the Coalition backbench committee for energy, Craig Kelly, described the costs of the subsidies as an “appalling waste” resulting from an “ideological rush to renewables”.

“No one will ever be able to compute the full opportunity cost of the alternate productive assets that this capital could have been invested in,” Mr Kelly said.

“We already have some of the highest electricity prices in the world. And what industry will we still have if we go down this track?”

Victorian Nationals MP Andrew Broad, chairman of the standing committee on the environment and energy, said the RET should be scrapped to allow renewables to compete on merit.

“To spend all that money and still have expensive power prices means the settings are all wrong,” Mr Broad said.

The Productivity Commission found the automotive industry received the equivalent of about $30bn of industry assistance between 1997 and 2012. It estimated up to 40,000 people might lose their jobs following the withdrawal of Toyota, Holden and Ford as carmakers in Australia, including job losses along the supply chain.

The 39 renewable energy projects under construction or being completed this year have created 4400 jobs, according to the Clean Energy Council’s latest figures.

ACIL Allen Consulting chief executive Paul Hyslop yesterday told a parliamentary inquiry that it was more cost-effective to hold off any investment decisions in low-emissions technologies under renewable energy schemes until the “last possible minute”.

“Solar costs have probably fallen 75 to 80 per cent in the last six or seven years,” Mr Hyslop told the energy and environment committee. “If we had not done anything seven years ago and today we then did all those things, we could have … two to three times as much solar (energy generation) in roofs for the same amount of investment over that period.

“If you think that the cost of ­renewables and low-emissions technology is falling rapidly, absolutely put it off for as long as possible.”

The Victorian government last week announced a 25 per cent RET by 2025, following South Australia’s 50 per cent target by 2025 and a 100 per cent target in the ACT.

Economist Geoffrey Carmody, a founder of Deloitte Access Economics, suggested solving the “trilemma” of low-emissions, reliable and low-cost energy should include nuclear power. The South Australian royal commission into nuclear power put the cost of a large-scale nuclear reactor at $9.3bn.

“If we sweep nuclear energy off the table in favour of renewables, achieving these three conflicting objectives with one instrument — renewable energy — is numerical nonsense,” Mr Carmody said.

Australia is the only G20 country to have banned nuclear power.

Mr Broad suggested yesterday that to provide investment certainty, the government could consider setting a higher emissions intensity threshold of 0.9 tonnes of carbon dioxide per megawatt hour as part of any clean-energy target for some projects — the terms of which could be reviewed after a set period of eight to 10 years.

“I think we’ve got to do something to create certainty in the market,” Mr Broad said.

He said a lower threshold of 0.6 tonnes — the scenario modelled by chief scientist Alan Finkel in his review into the national electricity market — would not cover a new coal-fired power station, although Dr Finkel has said the difference between the two thresholds would “not be substantial”.

The construction of a new 1000MW high-efficiency, low-emissions coal-fired power station has been estimated at $2.2bn according to an analysis compiled by power and energy specialists GHD and Solstice Development Services.

It found such a plant would deliver the cheapest electricity on the market.

Malcolm Turnbull this week opened the door to using finance from a $5bn federal infrastructure fund to help build a coal-fired power station.

Mr Kelly said yesterday a decision on a new plant needed to be made urgently because the 45-year-old Liddell coal-fired power station near Muswellbrook, NSW, was scheduled for closure in 2022 and it would take at least five years to build a new plant. He said it made sense for any new coal-fired power plant to be built in NSW instead of Queensland.

Queensland LNP leader Tim Nicholls is pledging to fast-track a project using the latest high-energy low-emissions technology to be built and run by the private sector.

“We basically need a decision on that by early next year,” Mr Kelly said. “A HELE plant would favourable.”

The cost of going green: taxpayers hit with a $60bn power bill | The Australian

 

Former Labor Party minister, Graham Richardson, on the money:

Every sector in our economy is struggling to cope with [electricity] prices that have almost doubled during the past five years … For the past few years many pensioners have sacrificed heat in winter and airconditioning in summer. Now low to middle-income families are frantically trying to reduce their power bills as well.

While all of this is happening, our Prime Minister sits down with the chiefs of the electricity companies to ask them to be nice to their clients and offer them the cheapest possible options. The problem is that in a free-market capitalist economy, private business is supposed to maximise profits for shareholders. I, for one, will not hang by the neck waiting for my friendly electricity retailer to offer me a way of paying them less. Surely Malcolm Turnbull has got something better to do to fill in his diary.

Andrew Bolt:

What a colossal waste – and to think that simply building the reactors would have given us more reliable power, too: “Taxpayers will have paid more than $60 billion through federal renewable energy subsidies by 2030, … enough to build about 10 large nuclear reactors.

$60 BILLION OF WARMIST WASTE | Herald Sun

Billions and billions more of taxpayers hard-earned money wasted on fake fixes to a fake catastrophe.

Insane.

•••

Related :


Small modular reactors could be operating in the UK by 2030 – report 

The sooner the better. Then UK hospitals won’t have to “turn off their lights and air-conditioners and turn on their emergency diesel generators to pump power back into the grid, every time British breezes turn to zephyrs.”

A true, “you can’t make this stuff up” story! …

https://climatism.wordpress.com/2016/09/13/uk-losing-patients-hospitals-face-power-cuts-when-wind-power-output-drops/

Tallbloke's Talkshop

Small modular reactor [credit: ANS Nuclear Cafe] Small modular reactor [credit: ANS Nuclear Cafe]
With enough government backing SMRs could be a competitive alternative to unreliable renewables in the long term. PoliticsHome reporting.

Small modular reactors (SMRs) could be operating in the UK by 2030 and the Government has a crucial role to play in encouraging early investor confidence, according to a new report by the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI). 

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The Game Changer: HuffPost Embraces Nuclear Power

The high priests of the Global Warming faith embracing Nuclear!

Sound the death knell for unreliable energy – wind/solar – as a fanciful baseload alternative to fossil fuels!

What a truly catastrophic disaster – environmentally, socially and economically the feel-good ‘Green’ energy experiment has been.

Sigh.

Watts Up With That?

Susquehanna steam electric nuclear power station Susquehanna steam electric nuclear power station

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

Huffpost has published a very supportive post, about New York State embracing nuclear power as an equal player in the low carbon energy game.

The Game Changer: New York’s Clean Energy Standard and Nuclear Energy

For years, I’ve said that when it comes to the challenge of fighting climate change, we will need every tool available to reduce carbon pollution and create opportunities for new clean energy technology.

Yet, despite a world that demands more carbon-free energy – not less – public policies have left some of the tools in the toolbox. Until now.

In August, with the help of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s leadership, the New York State PSC took unprecedented action in passing a Clean Energy Standard that, in addition to ensuring ample opportunity for more wind, solar, and energy efficiency, recognizes the important role of existing carbon-free…

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Idea of renewables powering UK is an ‘appalling delusion’ – David MacKay

“Humanity really does needs to pay attention to arithmetic and the laws of physics – we need a plan that adds up.”

Sage words.

NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

By Paul Homewood

h/t Realist10

image

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/may/03/idea-of-renewables-powering-uk-is-an-appalling-delusion-david-mackay

A couple of weeks after the untimely death of Sir David Mackay, formerly chief scientific adviser to DECC, the Guardian published a remarkably interview with him. I have highlighted certain sections:

The idea that renewable energy can power the UK is an “appalling delusion”, according to the final interview given by former chief scientific adviser, the late Professor Sir David MacKay.

The sensible energy and climate change plan for the UK, MacKay said, was for the country to focus on nuclear power and carbon capture storage technology, which traps the carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning. In that scenario, the amount of wind and solar the UK needed would be almost zero, he said.

However, solar could be a very important power source in other countries, he said, where sunny summers coincided with a big demand for electricity for air conditioning. Prof MacKay also…

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Environmentalists manage to kill the last nuclear power station in California

“Welcome to the darkness. You thought the Enron trading scam induced blackouts in California around 2000 were bad? Wait til 2025. Let’s all sit in the dark and chant kumabahya while we wait for wind and solar to come online again.”

Nuff said.

Watts Up With That?

From Forbes:

 More details Diablo Canyon Power Plant, 2009 photo from offshore. The light beige domes are the containment structures for Unit 1 and 2 reactors. The brown building is the turbine building where electricity is generated and sent to the grid. In the foreground is the Administration Building (black and white stripes). Picture:  "Mike" Michael L. Baird via Wikimedia
Diablo Canyon Power Plant, 2009 photo from offshore. The light beige domes are the containment structures for Unit 1 and 2 reactors. The brown building is the turbine building where electricity is generated and sent to the grid. In the foreground is the Administration Building (black and white stripes). Picture: “Mike” Michael L. Baird via Wikimedia

The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) issued a press release today stating that they have signed a deal with PG&E PCG +0.10%, IBEW local 1245, the Coalition of California Utility Employees, Friends of the Earth, Environment California, and the Alliance for Nuclear Responsibility.

There is an implied quid pro quo. The groups will support PG&E’s request for an extension from the California Lands Commission of its land use permit that allows access to ocean cooling water at the Commission’s June 28 meeting. In return, PG&E will agree to withdraw its 20-year license…

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Falling Down The Energy Ladder

“If the “zero emissions” evangelists were fair dinkum, they would support emissions-free nuclear power, but it seems that they oppose every energy option that is feasible”

This is because of the misanthropic belief structure of the Green eco-zealot. A position summed up by population freak Paul Ehrlich who blabbed in 1992, “Giving society cheap, abundant energy would be the equivalent of giving an idiot child a machine gun.”

The Club of Rome (environmental think-tank and consultants to the United Nations) in a similar misanthropic vein have stated, “The Earth has cancer and the cancer is Man.”

Green energy zealots want to push everyone off the energy ladder which has given us the modern world.

Read the rest of this excellent post by the great writer Viv Forbes…

No Leftist Crap

by Viv Forbes with help from volunteer reviewers, and Steve Hunter, Cartoonist.

Version 2 June 2016

When man first appeared on Earth he had no implements, no clothes, no farms, no mineral fuels, no machines and no electricity – his only tools were his brains, hands and muscles.

monkey

Everything that enables humans to live comfortably in a world where nature is indifferent to our survival has been discovered, invented, mined or manufactured over thousands of years by our inquisitive and innovative ancestors.

The history of civilisation is essentially the story of man’s progressive access to more efficient, more abundant and more reliable energy sources – from ancestral human muscles to modern nuclear power. It is also the story of how to store that energy and
deliver it with minimal losses to where it is most needed.

There are seven big steps on the human energy ladder –

1. Stone age energy…

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